Brendan Shick | Freelance Film, Broadcast, & Digital Media

4 Must Watch Director’s Commentaries – Even if You’re Not a Film Geek

4 Must Watch Director's Commentaries - Even if You're Not a Film Geek

4 Director's Commentaries for any sensibility or taste! At least one of these will appeal to you...
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Learning the Pitfalls of HFR

Learn the Pitfalls of HFR

Don't make the mistake of paying more for a lower quality theater experience. Here's a look at what HFR really does to your image straight from a cinematographer's mouth...errr...pen...err...whatever.
Baseball Broadcasts: Behind the Scenes

Broadcasting Baseball

Ever wonder how the game gets from the field to your television set? We're sharing a behind-the-scenes look.

Around the Web: “Lens Theives Ruin the Day” Editor's Pick

Around the Web: “Lens Theives Ruin the Day”

I’m usually pretty careful about keeping track of my equipment. Professional gear can be pretty expensive stuff and if you lose it you’re out a pretty nice chuck of change and your work suffers accordingly.

I stumbled across an interesting link at pixiq.com a while back that I’ve meant to share. It’s definitely worth reading if you’re a DSLR shooter.

What I Didn’t Like About Project 365 Editor's Pick

What I Didn’t Like About Project 365

At the start of the new year, I’ve not surprisingly noticed a lot of buzz about Project 365 around the web. The idea behind the Project 365 initiative is that participants take a single photo everyday for a year.

In theory, this gets photographers and even would-be-photographers out and moving. It gives them a reason to get out, practice, and hone their craft even on days where they don’t have a particular subject worth photographing right in front of them.

However, I tried Project 365 three years ago, and I didn’t like it.

The “Illusion of Movement Shot:” How to Make a Simple Shot Better in a Pinch Editor's Pick

The “Illusion of Movement Shot:” How to Make a Simple Shot Better in a Pinch

Today’s post is merely a simple tip for making any shot better with a minimum of added conceptual effort. Not that extra effort is a bad thing, but so many times on set we are pulled by the pressures of the shooting environment. Whether it be lack of budget, lack of time, or lack of patience from the subject, the crew must be ready and knowledgeable enough to compensate with a minimum sacrifice to quality.

For these situations, it’s good to have a “go to” plan. A shot choice that you can whip out quickly, but one that is also proven and effective. I don’t go with the textbook solution. I go with the one that works.

Insomnia (2002) Adds Interesting Twist to Director’s Commentary Editor's Pick

Insomnia (2002) Adds Interesting Twist to Director’s Commentary

It’s rare that I single out one director’s commentary as being better or worse than another. Nonetheless, my recent watch of the commentary on Insomnia (2002) sparked me to write this post.

It’s not merely because Christopher Nolan happens to be one of my favorite and most respected directors. It’s not even necessarily because this commentary is better than others.

No, this commentary is quite unique in how it is presented.

Why Slow Motion Looks Awesome: The Reason You Didn’t Think Of Editor's Pick

Why Slow Motion Looks Awesome: The Reason You Didn’t Think Of

Ever watch one of those slow motion compilations, usually showcasing the Phantom line of high-speed HD cameras? Assuming you have, you were probably stunned at how different the world looks when slowed way down.

In the world of cinematography, it’s not uncommon to hear people raving about the ability to shoot at 2,000 frames/second or greater. Most of the discussion, however, revolves around one of two things: either the amazing ability of today’s cameras to capture scenes at such high frame rates or the sheer amazement of what you can see in slow motion that you can’t see in realtime.

However, when you watch high-speed footage with a more critical eye, I believe there is another reason that we’re impressed with it that I’m sure not as many people have considered…

The Importance of Type (Part Three: Having the Eye) Editor's Pick
Aug 09 2011

The Importance of Type (Part Three: Having the Eye)

Time for the last installment of this series. Now that we’ve looked at the process and options available to those creating text onscreen, it’s time to wrap it all up – does what you’ve created actually look good? As you practice the art to creating good text over time, you’ll develop an eye for determining this. Function […]

The Importance of Type (Part Two: Getting Creative) Editor's Pick
Aug 05 2011

The Importance of Type (Part Two: Getting Creative)

In part one, I described the different programs available for creating text for film. Today, I’m going to share some tips and tricks for actually achieving good results from that software. Generally speaking, these tips are not platform-specific and should work with whatever program you choose to use (although they may be easier to manipulate […]

The Importance of Type (Part One: My Methods) Editor's Pick
Aug 04 2011

The Importance of Type (Part One: My Methods)

A few months ago I was watching the rough edit of a student film, preparing to offer critiques and suggestions for improvement afterward. Unlike many student films, this was a fairly well put together piece overall – decent directing, cinematography, etc. However, one aspect of the film stood out to me as distracting and lacking the […]

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