Brendan Shick | Freelance Film, Broadcast, & Digital Media

4 Must Watch Director’s Commentaries – Even if You’re Not a Film Geek

4 Must Watch Director's Commentaries - Even if You're Not a Film Geek

4 Director's Commentaries for any sensibility or taste! At least one of these will appeal to you...
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – Learning the Pitfalls of HFR

Learn the Pitfalls of HFR

Don't make the mistake of paying more for a lower quality theater experience. Here's a look at what HFR really does to your image straight from a cinematographer's mouth...errr...pen...err...whatever.
Baseball Broadcasts: Behind the Scenes

Broadcasting Baseball

Ever wonder how the game gets from the field to your television set? We're sharing a behind-the-scenes look.

Baseball Broadcasts: Behind the Scenes, Part 2 Editor's Pick

Baseball Broadcasts: Behind the Scenes, Part 2

Obviously, when covering a MLB game on FSN, NESN, MASN, Root Sports, or ESPN there are more than 5 cameras. We’ve already discussed how these additional cameras are only used for about 15% of shots – and mostly just during replays at that.

We also talked about a few basic ways to supplement the 5-6 camera setup. Now, we’re looking at some of the places you stash the excess cameras in a high budget broadcast to get the best angles.

Baseball Broadcasts: Behind the Scenes Editor's Pick

Baseball Broadcasts: Behind the Scenes

As a sports broadcasting professional, I thought I’d share a little insight into what it takes to broadcast a baseball game. Different networks and stadiums obviously necessitate slightly different setups. The crew needs of ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball looks totally different than say that of the American Legion World Series on ESPN3. Having worked in the past with people who’ve worked on one or the other, obviously the main difference is one of scale.

MLB broadcasts easily push the number of cameras to double digits. Other broadcasts use only four or five. Regardless, the concepts behind-the-scenes are the same. It’s perhaps easier to learn about and understand these concepts by looking at the smaller scale productions and building from there.

White Balance: Important Tips and Tricks Someone Forgot to Teach You Editor's Pick

White Balance: Important Tips and Tricks Someone Forgot to Teach You

I’ve met a great variety of people, some with graduate degrees in cinematography, perpetuating this rumor (and yes, sometimes I’m even guilty of such). Although it’s good and simple beginner advice, there’s a lot more to the story.

The ‘white card’ tip is only partly true and, quite frankly, is an extremely simplified version of the truth that is probably partly perpetuated by people who don’t feel like spending the time to explain the full story to you.

Assuming you read on, I’m about to put an end to that as best I can.

Inspirational Photography: My Number One Secret to Taking Better Photographs Editor's Pick

Inspirational Photography: My Number One Secret to Taking Better Photographs

All the secrets of outstanding photography can really be boiled down into one fairly simple goal. It sounds like a high calling, and in some ways it is. Only the best photographs live up to this standard.

And yet, if you keep it in mind regularly while shooting, it really doesn’t seem that hard anymore. Even when I don’t fully accomplish this goal, just keeping it in mind as a benchmark improves the images I bring home.

Find out what it is…

The “Illusion of Movement Shot:” How to Make a Simple Shot Better in a Pinch Editor's Pick

The “Illusion of Movement Shot:” How to Make a Simple Shot Better in a Pinch

Today’s post is merely a simple tip for making any shot better with a minimum of added conceptual effort. Not that extra effort is a bad thing, but so many times on set we are pulled by the pressures of the shooting environment. Whether it be lack of budget, lack of time, or lack of patience from the subject, the crew must be ready and knowledgeable enough to compensate with a minimum sacrifice to quality.

For these situations, it’s good to have a “go to” plan. A shot choice that you can whip out quickly, but one that is also proven and effective. I don’t go with the textbook solution. I go with the one that works.

The Importance of Type (Part Three: Having the Eye) Editor's Pick
Aug 09 2011

The Importance of Type (Part Three: Having the Eye)

Time for the last installment of this series. Now that we’ve looked at the process and options available to those creating text onscreen, it’s time to wrap it all up – does what you’ve created actually look good? As you practice the art to creating good text over time, you’ll develop an eye for determining this. Function […]

The Importance of Type (Part Two: Getting Creative) Editor's Pick
Aug 05 2011

The Importance of Type (Part Two: Getting Creative)

In part one, I described the different programs available for creating text for film. Today, I’m going to share some tips and tricks for actually achieving good results from that software. Generally speaking, these tips are not platform-specific and should work with whatever program you choose to use (although they may be easier to manipulate […]

The Importance of Type (Part One: My Methods) Editor's Pick
Aug 04 2011

The Importance of Type (Part One: My Methods)

A few months ago I was watching the rough edit of a student film, preparing to offer critiques and suggestions for improvement afterward. Unlike many student films, this was a fairly well put together piece overall – decent directing, cinematography, etc. However, one aspect of the film stood out to me as distracting and lacking the […]

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